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Pierre THIBODEAU

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Birth  Abt 1631  Province of Poitou, France  [1,2
Sex  Male 
Died  26 Dec 1704  Port Royal, Acadia  [3,4
Person ID  I3033  Green Tree 
Last Modified  30 Mar 2014 
 
Father  Mathurin Phibauda THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1594, Marans Poitou, France 
Mother  Marie DOLBEAU 
Group Sheet  F1561  Green Tree 
 
Family 1  Jeanne THERIOT, b. 1643 
Married  Abt 1660  [5] 
Children 
 1. Marie THIBODEAU, b. 1661, St-Charles-des-Mines, Acadia
 2. Marie "L'Cadette" THIBODEAU, b. 1663
 3. Marie THIBODEAU, b. 1664
 4. Anne-Marie THIBODEAU, b. 1666, Acadie
 5. Marie-Catherine THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1667
 6. Pierre "L'Aine" THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1670
 7. Jeanne THIBODEAU, b. 1672
 8. Jean THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1674, Port Royal, Acadie
 9. Antoine THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1676
 10. Pierre "LeJeune" THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1678
 11. Michel THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1680
 12. Cecile THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1680
 13. Anne-Marie THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1682
 14. Claude THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1685, Port-Royal, Acadie, Canada
 15. Catherine-Josephe THIBODEAU, b. Abt 1686
 16. Charles THIBODEAU, b. 1689
Group Sheet  F1081  Green Tree 
 
Notes 
  • Pierre arrived at Port Royal, Acadia in 1654, under contract for three years at a wage of 100 livres per year (this information is contained in the "Catalogue des Immigrants" By Marcel Trudel).

    Listed as a farmer (the 1671 census states "a plowman having seven arpents of cleared land"), he was
    a miller (un meunier), owned a grist mill at Pree' Ronde, on upper Port Royal River,

    In 1698 with four of his sons and several of his compatriots he founded the town of Chipoudy, now Hopewell Hill, New Brunswick.

    There is good documentation about Pierre as one of his daughters married the secretary of the governor of Acadia. He was so popular with the governor and his co-settlers that he was given the role of "Sieur", a semi-noble title. Pierre and Jeanne had a total of 16 known children.

    In 1981 a monument to him was erected at Round Hill, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia as the first white settler to live there.

    The second oldest son, who with his father and brothers established Chipoudy, the family village.

    Information from a 1994 Newspaper Article.
    “The ancestor of this family in Acadia, Pierre Thibodeau, is believed to have been born in 1630 in Marans, a village near La Rochelle, France. He followed Emmanuel LeBorgne de Belle-Isle to Acadia as a young man during the middle of the 1650s. Shortly after his arrival he married a young Acadian girl, Jeanne Theriault, who gave birth to 17 children.
    “Pierre Thibodeau settled approximately 17 kilometres from the mouth of the Port-Royal river in a lovely spot called Pree-Ronde. There he built his house, his farm and his flour and grist mill. Pierre was undoubtedly prosperous but he had larger ambitions. On June 20, 1695, Governor de Frontenac granted him on the Kennebec river (Maine), a seigniory two leagues deep and a league on each bank of the Kennebec river along with the islands.
    “At the age of 67, the enterprising Pierre Thibodeau decided to found a new community on the northern part of Baie Francaise (Fundy) called Chipoudie, now Hopewell Cape. He associated his sons and a few neighbors for this new foundation and had the necessary machinery for a flour and grist mill brought over from Boston.
    “In addition to his occupations as a farmer and a miller, Pierre Thibodeau was also a merchant. He traded furs with the Indians. Pierre Thibodeau died at Pree-Ronde and was buried at Port-Royal on December 27, 1704. His children settled at Port-Royal, Grand-Pre and Chipoudie.”
    From: Telegraph-Journal, Wednesday, August 10, 1994; p. A8

    The following is what I have obtained in my research for the story of Pierre

    Thibodeau and Pierre Terriot.
    Shirley Thibodeaux LeBlanc
    President, Thibodeaux Family Association Louisiana

    Pierre arrived at Port Royal, Acadia in 1654, under contract for three years

    at a wage of 100 livres per year (this information is contained in the
    "Catalogue des Immigrants" By Marcel Trudel).

    Listed as a farmer (the 1671 census states "a plowman having seven arpents
    of cleared land"), he was a miller (un meunier), owned a grist mill at Pree'

    Ronde, on upper Port Royal River. In 1698 with four of his sons and
    several of his compatriots he founded the town of Chipoudy, now Hopewell
    Hill, New Brunswick.

    There is good documentation about Pierre as one of his daughters marri
    the secretary of the governor of Acadia. He was so popular with the governor

    and his co-settlers that he was given the role of "Sieur", a semi-noble
    title. Pierre and Jeanne had a total of 16 known children.

    The following article from the magazine "Acadian Genealogy Exchange" states: On November 8, 1980 a monument to him was unveiled at Round Hill, Annapolis
    County, Nova Scotia as the first white settler to live in the Round Hill
    area. " The marker was made possible by Nova Scotia Museum director, J. L.
    Martin, who furnished the plaque, and by joint efforts of the Historical
    Association or Annapolis Royal and La Societe Historique Acadienne de la
    Baie Sainte-Marie."

    REFN: 1
    Our North American beginning can be traced to Pierre Thibodeau. All
    searching for information on earlier history is "greatly dark." Pierre
    sailing is unknown for certain, no shipping list containing his name has
    been found. The only clue to his coming is that he arrived around 1651-1652

    accompanying Emmanuel LeBorgne, a merchant of La Rochelle, France and t
    principal creditor of D'Aulnay, Governor of Acadia. Pierre Thibodeau, t
    settler at Pree Ronde, Acadia (Round Hill, Nova Scotia), was most likely
    from the Poitou region of France, and had sailed from La Rochelle, France.
    He was born between 1624 and 1631 according to the Acadian census and h
    death certificate.

    Following the usual terms of indentured service, Pierre Thibodeau, now free,

    married (about 1660) Jeanne Terriot, daughter of Jean Terriot and Perri
    Beau who had come to Acadia in the D'Aulnay years. The census of 1671,
    taken shortly after the French regained title of Acadia, lists Pierre
    Thibodeau as a ploughman (farmer). This census lists his age as forty, and
    he is given as father of five daughters and a son. From this census of
    Acadia we take his age to be about twenty years, when Pierre ventured to
    this new land which was to become his home. This is the period when families

    were moving away
    from the Seigneur land holdings at Port Royal and away from the feudal
    queries, that Pierre Thibodeau decided to move from the Port Royal area to
    Pree Ronde up the Annapolis River. There he added a grist mill to his
    marshlands farm and finally a saw mill. His property consisted of four farm
    buildings and his mills of grain and planks, constructed on the stream of
    Loups Marins.
    A 1710 chart, located in the Museum of Fort Ann at Annapolis Royal clearly

    shows his property, home and out
    buildings and the two mills on the "Stream Loups Marins." His family grew to

    sixteen children, (seven sons and nine daughters). We can still find
    evidence, in the woods neighboring Round Hill, of the winding stream whose
    current would have turned the wheels that worked the Thibodeau mills. It is

    now a narrow stream, winding, rocky, and partially dry though it is
    perfectly visible. It invokes memories of olden times when colonist would
    come to have their grain ground and logs sawed at the mills. When we look at

    the parish records of birth of Pierre's and Jeanne's children. The register

    records the name of
    three Maries, born in a row, then a Anne Marie, followed by Catherine. Five
    daughter before the first son Pierre was born, ten years after their
    marriage. This must have created a complication for Pierre and Jeanne, when

    extra hands were needed for the harvest, and other farm work, and for years
    they had only girls. The last child was born when Jeanne was about 45 years

    old and had spent some 28 years of her life either pregnant, nursing or
    both.

    After Jeanne's birth, four boys followed in succession. After the birth of
    Jeanne the sixth daughter one can well imagine family life being focused
    through the 1660's around the daughters. In the 1680's these daughters had
    married and moved into their own homes, and life now focused around the four

    teenage sons, who remained with the household until the turn of the century. The old custom, where the family estate went to the eldest son was
    not regularly practiced in Acadia. Burdened with large families, it was the

    middle or younger sons who became heirs of the family homestead. The eldest

    sons in Acadia were far more likely to set out on their own as to bri
    young bride into the ancestral homestead. In Pierre's family, the ancestral
    responsibility fell to the third son Antoine, who at thirty had been married

    for little more than a year when his father died. Jean the second son and a

    year older than Antoine had like his older brother moved out to devel
    place of his own. The younger boys, as in the practice of the time, would
    work for their board under their mother.
 
Sources  1. [S208]   Dictionnaire Genealogue des Families Acadiennes - Stephen A. White. After 1686 Census
2. [S208]   Dictionnaire Genealogue des Families Acadiennes - Stephen A. White. After 1686 Census
3. [S208]   Dictionnaire Genealogue des Families Acadiennes - Stephen A. White. After 1686 Census
4. [S208]   Dictionnaire Genealogue des Families Acadiennes - Stephen A. White. After 1686 Census
5. [S208]   Dictionnaire Genealogue des Families Acadiennes - Stephen A. White. After 1686 Census
 
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